Vigeland Sculptures in Frogner Park, Oslo, Norway - Europe's Most Controversial Sculpture Installation

The Frogner Park in Oslo is a perfect place for those who seek for shelter from a busy, modern city. But it wouldn't be world famous if it were just an ordinary park with trees, alleys and lawns. Within its boundaries, the Frogner Park holds the controversial sculpture installation by Gustav Vigeland which boasts over 200 statues and is the largest in the world such installation created by a single artist. Easy to reach, the strange Vigeland's sculptures should be seen by everyone who is visiting the diverse Norwegian capital, so don't miss it!

 

How to get to Vigeland Sculpture Installation

 

From Oslo's city center you will have to take a bus or a tram - they are very frequent and the journey is not longer than 25 mins. Bus 20 or tram 12 go directly to the park. Make sure you buy your ticket from one of the ticket machines or at a newsagent's - one way ticket is 30 NOK (3.50 EUR/3.90 USD). Yes it is pricey - you are in Olso! But if you think that's expensive - in case you want to buy the ticket from the driver - it will cost you as much as 50 NOK (5.50 EUR/6 USD)!

 

Visiting Vigeland Sculptures Installation

 

The entry to the Vigeland Sculptures Installation is free of charge.

Vigeland completed the installation in 1943. The controversy arises even before you have a look at the statues - many art critics stated that the exhibition expresses Nazi or fascist aesthetics.

There are over 200 bronze and granite sculptures and reliefs within the installation in the Frogner Park. Some call it "Vigeland Sculptures Park" but it's incorrect as the sculptures area is only a part of the much bigger park itself.

There are five main sections of the installation: The Main Gate, The Bridge with Children's Playground, the Fountain, the Monolith and the Wheel of Life.

Most of the statues are nude (both children and adults) and depicted in a very unusual, weird way. Although the sculptures resemble normal human bodies, they take very unnatural, illogical positions, and are strangely twisted and wrapped with one another. You will see some sexual implications, babies being kicked and thrown around in all directions, children 'riding' their carer like a horse, and the main monument - the monolith is made of dozens of bodies braided together forming a pillar.

Out of all modern art exhibitions, this one is pretty weird yet very interesting to watch - it's out there in the open (you don't have to visit any museums), free of charge and it immediately raises the question: "What did the artist really mean by all this?".

 

 The bronze statues - Vigeland Installation

The bronze statues - Vigeland Installation

 Vigeland Installation

Vigeland Installation

 Vigeland Installation

Vigeland Installation

 It's difficult to get what the artist meant here...

It's difficult to get what the artist meant here...

 Vigeland Installation

Vigeland Installation

 The monolith

The monolith

 The monolith - close up

The monolith - close up

 "Children's playground"

"Children's playground"

 The gate

The gate

 No comment here

No comment here

 Another gate to the monolith

Another gate to the monolith

 ...and yet another gate

...and yet another gate

 The stairs

The stairs

 Purple tulips in Frogner Park

Purple tulips in Frogner Park

 

If you want to find out about other interesting things to visit in Oslo and how expensive it really is, I've described it in this article.

 

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